“We Got This!”

“We got this,” were the most important, comforting and powerful words I have heard in a long time.  Right before they were spoken to me, I was feeling panicked. Wondering how I was going to have the strength, to get through the next moment, let alone the next day. I didn’t know how I was going to muster up the courage to face the pain of an original wound, while at the same time deciding if it’s safe for me to break the code of silence that is still deeply ingrained in my psyche.

On that cold and snowy afternoon,  as I was getting ready to leave my therapist’s office, a sense of panic overwhelmed me. Not only panic of what I was facing but the panic of attachment. I feared I would be too much for her, that she would bail, that she would panic and become frightened by what she was hearing. But then something completely unexpected happened. In a calm and reassuring voice, my therapist said, “We Got This!” Those words landed layers deep and made all the negative self-talk dissipate. Those three little words hit me with the softness of the kindest hug and the safety of the bravest shield and I believed her the moment she said them to me.

I still feel like I have to fight for my life, my mental health, and for the freedom from the skeleton hands of the past that keep trying to pull me down. I understand that the hard work of healing happens when I get home; between therapy sessions. Processing what was talked about, incorporating the tools for distress tolerance, trying to feel safe enough to just-sit with it all, while also managing my symptoms of PTSD often feels like a full-time job. That’s okay! I’m more than willing to do the things I need to do so I can live the life I want to live.

Since that day, I have been able to trust that I can handle this new step on my journey. Even though I feel like the ground beneath me is a bit wobbly, I can walk with my head up, eyes forward. I know if I stumble, panic, or feel the sour breath of the monsters, that, with help, I will keep moving forward.

I don’t know what sort of challenges I will be facing as I work to heal this wound that’s ready to be acknowledged. But I do know that with acceptance, self-compassion, and support, I will be able to work through whatever is next. How do I know? Because “We Got This!”

Thank you for reading my books: If I Could Tell You How It Feels, and Untangled, A Story of Resilience, Courage, and Triumph      

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67 thoughts on ““We Got This!”

  1. Yes I avoid doctors at all costs except for the times I had to go to the Emergency Room and even there I didn’t get the proper treatment. Basically doctors and therapists just want to give you pills and get rid of you.

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  2. I’m so sorry I’m just getting back to you now. I missed this comment the other day. I have been to a few professionals who were not very skilled, and extremely negligent. I have had some really terrible experiences with medical professionals. But, I have been lucky with being diagnosed correctly with PTSD right away. I know that is often not the case. Those people are misdiagnosed for years before they get the right diagnosis and the right help. My last two therapists have been wonderful. The first one I saw for eight years, this current one, I have been seeing for about 16 months. I also finally found a good doctor about three years ago. It takes me forever to trust anyone in the medical field (I have a serious aversion to doctors) and it takes me about a year to trust a therapist, and that is really trusting conditionally. I have heard some horror stories about in-patient mental health care. It sounds like your experience warrants your decision to walk away from that kind of care. Trusting our gut in so important!!

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  3. What a simple but powerful phrase. It reminds me to speak words of encouragement to other people….almost no effort on my part and it may make all the difference to someone. Thanks for sharing.

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  4. Those words are powerful Alexis. Knowing that we are in control of the situation makes us more comfortable. I am glad that you were able to hear these words and let it resonate with you. However, when it comes to the strength to deal with anything that you are facing, you do not have to do it alone, you can always ask God for help. God is an ever present help in times of need. When we pray to God and ask him for assistance, he is able to help us. At times, it is even best to give a situation to God. God is the author of creative solutions, and I am sure that he is more than able to be very useful to you in your healing process. If you do not yet have a relationship with God, I will suggest that you begin one.

    God says in Isaiah 41:10
    ‘Don’t be afraid, for I am with you.
    Don’t be discouraged, for I am your God.
    I will strengthen you and help you.
    I will hold you up with my victorious right hand”.

    Stay Strong sis ❤ ❤

    If you want to know about God in more detail, you can find further information here https://christcenteredruminations.wordpress.com/2018/10/23/a-few-things-that-i-have-learned-about-god/ And Here https://christcenteredruminations.wordpress.com/2018/08/29/how-to-build-a-relationship-with-god/

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  5. And you my friend do as well! You keep on fighting and healing and resting when you need too. I actually tried to comment on your post about your recent hospital experience but my reader kept crashing. You got this!! ❤️

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  6. PTSD is a tricky illness for sure. I have run across many people who have had these similar experiences, or gets misdiagnosed for years. Im glad more research is being done all the time so more and more therapists can become better trained.

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  7. “I’m more than willing to do the things I need to do so I can live the life I want to live” < Never forget that, never stop working towards the life you want and deserve. The ground may be wobbly but you are clearly a warrior and one hell of a tough cookie, so hang in there because you've definitely got this! xxxx

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  8. That’s a long time. I trusted straight away her because she knew about PTSD and (with the exception of my husband) other people and professionals were quite clueless. I even had one nurse say that I would get better without therapy, all on my own. Quite wrong. PTSD isn’t depression although that may result from the symptoms.

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  9. I’m going to practice saying this to myself, and to my friends when they’re having a bad time. Oh and my teenage son, when he’s getting a bit overwhelmed by life’s challenges 🙂
    Thank you xO G

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  10. It’s always interesting to read about your experience with therapy, therapists and doctors. I wonder where you find these positive supportive mental health professionals. All my experiences with doctors were negative. In fact the hospital where I was incarcerated was so horrible that the nurses who worked there told me not to come back. In the mental ward I saw and went through things that only made me worse. Experiences that I can never discuss. To this day I never returned to any therapists and I never will. I found out that some things are better kept unsaid. Mental hospitals are prisons and doctors are wardens skilled at torture. Walking away from psychiatric care was one of my better decisions.

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  11. Today is my Birthday and I made the decision to enter into the Silence. I’ve been focusing on my Photography and artwork. Phasing out blogging. Except for information about opportunities. Nothing personal or private especially when it comes to health. Physical or mental. In fact I deleted every Blog Post about that topic. Eventually I hope to go Off Grid and move on with real life.

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  12. Sometimes it takes time to find the right therapist, the one you trust. It took me about 7 months, those weeks were awful. The reassurance that you are in the hands of someone who understands what is going on with your head, who understands PTSD, is priceless.

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  13. Okay. Yes. If I drove then I would wear them more often. However like most folks who Live in New York City it’s the subway and bus for me. I’m very Thankful for Public transportation especially when I had to stop driving. Also I Live near the subway. Occasionally I will use the Lyft car service but not very often. I started working part time at the Brooklyn Public Library which is less than 30 minutes from home.

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  14. I wear them from car to inside a destination. Im in MN and the winter has been brutal this year. I went to a meeting today dressed up in nice clothes, but with my sorrels on. Its almost March…its almost Spring!

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  15. Sylvester serves as my therapy cat. Photography, art and Journaling help me cope with the turmoil inside my head. I’m looking forward to summer, getting to Coney Island beach early while hanging with the Seagulls and other Grey heads enjoying the early morning quiet.

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  16. Great. The winters in New York City can be pretty rough. Not only must I Travel through ice and Snow but I normally am shoveling the Snow. For the frozen icy weather conditions I wear my insulated lined inside Uggs. The temperature can Drop to the Single Digits and Uggs will keep feet warm and dry. As for my blue cat boots I can only wear those in the Spring or Fall.

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  17. Thank you. My first therapist had told me he had my back and I had written about that a couple of years ago. You and I have been reading each others words for a while now, haven’t we! 😊 This piece today is about my therapist I have been working with for about 15 months. By the way…the blue boots with the cats on them that I bought after you shared about them last winter are still holding up. 2nd winter in a row!

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