Parenting with PTSD

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13 thoughts on “Parenting with PTSD

  1. Im so glad you shared your experience with me Denise. Its always a tricky dance to talk about parenting anyway, but to open up that we do it with an illness is vulnerability for sure. Have a great Sunday. ❤️❤️

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  2. Good grief… can’t agree more. I so relate to your experience it’s almost eerie.

    Dealing with my PTSD symptoms turned our world upside down. I discovered people are quick to help if you have cancer or a death in the family but mental health? Not so much. It’s a very lonely and misunderstood world.

    Once I got on the other side, helping break down the barriers and increase understanding and compassion is my passion.

    You are clearly doing the same thing. 💞

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  3. These kids aren’t hit or sexually abused. They are nurtured as best we can. We still yell sometimes and it’s less than before we started therapy. We do our best. Spouse is nurturing and calm and big-hearted. Feelings matter here!

    We need parenting, too. So much hurt and missed out on soothing nurturing. Try to get that from therapy: therapists help as we learn to provide internal parenting.

    We are isolated mostly. It’s always sooo heartening to hear it can get better! Your words are hope for some of us. Yay for you! Doing your best

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  4. That compassion and passion to share and support others with PTSD is hugely important to me.

    For me also.

    The Buddhist taught me that the gift, our experience, our blog, my group and your books, the giver us, and the receiver our audience are all equal.

    Those I help support gives me real pleasure and maybe happiness. Sharing reinforces what we know and need to observe.

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  5. Thank you for your insight and support Marty. That compassion and passion to share and support others with PTSD is hugely important to me. Im grateful I have found ways to be able to do that.
    I didnt know that it impacts women 2 to 1 except for war. Thats really interesting! Thanks for sharing. Im glad we’ve connected.

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  6. Great post. Those who have lived ptsd can identify with terror this disorder brings into our life.

    Dealing with family, friends, work and life changes drastically.

    For me, a parent was my abuser throughout childhood. My dysfunctional family needing to look perfect, disowned me when I asked for help.

    The path to healing brings enormous challenges.

    Those who have never experienced their nervous system upside down or their fight or flight mechanism firing 40 times a day.

    Sorry about your daughter but she has taken action to protect her family. Emergency room doctors and nurses, EMT people and cops get ptsd from experiencing trauma second hand.

    Your daughters experience ignited her compassion center and love for you.

    Your love for your kid and actions overpowered PTSD symptoms.

    I believe those of us who have healed, coming back to share and supports other ptsd sufferers are needed.

    You are helping many. PTSD impacts women 2 to 1 except for war.

    Liked by 1 person

  7. I think that’s such an important point about kids growing up knowing that it’s okay to ask for help. Having a parent with mental illness, especially a parent who’s actively reaching out for treatment, can be such a great way to humanize mental illness for these kids.

    Liked by 1 person

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